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The Monster Frankenpooh
Season 2, Episode 6b
Themonsterfrankenpooh
Production Information
Director

Terence Harrison
Ken Kessel (supervising director)

Writer

Mark Zaslove (story)
Carter Crocker (story and teleplay)

Prod code

206b

Airdate

October 14, 1989

Episode Chronology
Previous

No Rabbit's a Fortress

Next

Where, Oh Where Has My Piglet Gone?

The Monster Frankenpooh is the second segment of the sixth episode of the second season of The New Adventures of Winnie the Pooh. It originally aired on ABC in October 14, 1989.

Synopsis

It is a dark night in the Hundred Acre Wood, and Piglet wants to tell a nice, not-so-scary story, but Tigger tells a very scary story about Dr. Von Piglet creating The Monster Frankenpooh, scaring Piglet to no end.

Plot

This article/section features spoilers. Continue reading at your own risk.

Tigger, Rabbit, Gopher and Piglet are telling stories on a dark night in the Hundred Acre Wood. Tigger wants Piglet to tell a story about ghosties, spookables and “things that go shopping in the night”. But Piglet says he wants to tell a “not-so-scary story” about a scientist.

In the story, Piglet sets the scene in a castle in the middle of the day. Tigger says the story should be in the nighttime, and the day turns to night. Piglet and Tigger go back and forth, changing the story from day to night. Tigger confuses Piglet and the story stays at night. Tigger adds a thunderstorm. Inside the castle, a scientist who looks exactly like Piglet is in a laboratory making a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Tigger interrupts again and says, “this story is so unscary, it’s scary!”

Outside the story, Tigger is fed up with how the story is going and gets up to leave to “go trim Pooh’s toenails”. Rabbit tries to get Tigger to stay. Tigger says that if the story is going to be about a scientist, then he oughta at least be doing something “terribibble,” like creating a “boogly, boogey monster!”

In the story, there is something under the blanket on the table the scientist Piglet is working on. Tigger names it The Monster Frankenpooh as it sits up. The blanket comes off and The Monster Frankenpooh looks exactly like Winnie the Pooh. Tigger says the monster is “absotutely perfect,” but thinks the monster should be bigger. Frankenpooh suddenly grows bigger, big enough to sit on the table. Tigger is still displeased with the size of his monster, so he makes Frankenpooh even bigger. Tigger wants the monster to be even bigger still, so he makes Frankenpooh so big that he hits his head on the ceiling of the castle. Finally, Tigger is happy with the size of The Monster Frankenpooh. The terrified scientist runs around Frankenpooh feel yelling for help, and then breaks the fourth wall, saying “this is so very terrifying,” before running away. Frankenpooh slowly begins to walk out of the castle, looking for honey.

Outside the castle, Frankenpooh walks through a farmer who looks like Rabbit's garden, and he yells of a monster. Frankenpooh makes his way to Gopher’s hole, and walks over it, making Gopher, who also yells of a monster, fall a very long fall all the way down his hole. Tigger appears and asks if the audience is scared.

Outside the story, Tigger says how the “giganticically monstrous monstrosity” is unstoppable.

Inside the story, the giant Frankenpooh walks along, yelling for honey.

Outside the story, Piglet stops the story and tells Tigger that the story is much too scary, and suggests that he takes over.

Inside the story, Rabbit and Gopher are running scared around Frankenpooh’s feet. Piglet says the size of the monster is all wrong to have on him, and Frankenpooh instantly shrinks back to the small size he was at the beginning of the story. Outside the story, Tigger agrees with Piglet about the monster’s size, and says that the monster should be “quadroopily as big!” Inside the story, Frankenpooh grows very rapidly, and grows so big that he reaches the top of the film strip the cartoon is being made on. Frankenpooh breaks the fourth wall and comments on his size to Tigger. Tigger agrees that he overdid the size of the monster, and shrinks Frankenpooh back to his original, but still big, monster size. Frankenpooh continues on his way looking for honey. Eventually, he finds a house, sits down in front of it and tries to reach inside it (only being able to fit his arm inside it) to look for honey.

Meanwhile, a trio of angry villagers (Rabbit, Gopher and Owl) run to The scientist’s castle, claiming that he is the one who made the giant monster. The scientist, who is putting out empty milk bottles, is frightened by the villagers and runs away into the castle, as the villagers chase after. Piglet hides and pleads that the whole thing was an accident.

Outside the story, Piglet is trembling in fear. Tigger, Rabbit and Gopher are confused, and go to comfort Piglet, assuring him that it was only a story and there is nothing to be afraid of. Rabbit says that Piglet should learn the difference between what is real and what is not. Rabbit asks Pooh if he agrees.

Across the room, Pooh is sitting on the ground, but he is the same giant size he was in the story. Pooh also agrees that he shouldn’t take things so seriously either.

Characters

Cast

Voice actor Character
Jim Cummings Winnie the Pooh
John Fiedler Piglet
Paul Winchell Tigger
Ken Sansom Rabbit
Michael Gough Gopher
Hal Smith Owl

Credits

Produced By

WALT DISNEY

TELEVISION ANIMATION

Producers

KEN KESSEL

ED GHERTNER

Supervising Director

KEN KESSEL

Story Editor

MARK ZASLOVE

Director

TERENCE HARRISON

Assistant Story Editors

CARTER CROCKER

BRUCE TALKINGTON

“NO RABBIT’S A FORTRESS”

Story by

STEPHEN SUSTARSIC

MARK ZASLOVE

Teleplay by

STEPHEN SUSTARSIC

BRUCE TALKINGTON

MARK ZASLOVE

“THE MONSTER FRANKENPOOH”

Story by

CARTER CROCKER

MARK ZASLOVE

Teleplay by

CARTER CROCKER

With the Talents of

JOHN FIEDLER

KEN SANSOM

HAL SMITH

MICHAEL GOUGH

JIM CUMMINGS

as Winnie the Pooh

and

PAUL WINCHELL

as

Tigger

Assistant Producer

BARBARA FERRO

Art Director

ED GHERTNER

Storyboard Designers

TOM SITO

HANK TUCKER

Key Layout Design

JIM SCHLENKER

Character Design

LEONARD SMITH

Background Styling

PARO HOZUMI

Color Stylist

JILL STIRDIVANT

Supervising Timing Director

MIRCEA MANTTA

Timing Directors

JOAN CASE

RICK LEON

MITCH ROCHON

Track Reader

SKIP CRAIG

Script Coordinator

LEONA JERNIGAN

Archives Administrator

KRISTA BUNN

Artwork Coordinator

KAREN SILVA

Talent Coordinator

OLIVIA MINER

Post Production Manager

SARA DURAN

Post Production Coordinator

BARBARA BECK

Production Assistants

PEGGY BECKER

JEFFREY ARTHUR

WADE NASSIR

Managing Film Editor

RICH HARRISON

Supervising Editor

CHARLIE KING

Editor

RICK HINSON

Assistant Editor

GLENN LEWIS

Songs Written and Produced

by

STEVE NELSON

Music by

STEVE NELSON

&

THOM SHARP

Animation Production by

WALT DISNEY

TELEVISION ANIMATION

AUSTRALIA

Animation Supervisor

DALE CASE

THIS PICTURE MADE UNDER

THIS JURISDICTION OF

*.

AFFILIATED WITH

A.F.L. C.I.O.

©1989 THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY

All Rights Reserved

Quotes

Piglet: “Once upon a time...”

Tigger: “Say! It’s the middle of broad daylight! Even a not-so-scary scary story has to happen at night, you know!” 

(The story suddenly shifts from day to night)

Piglet: “Oh... but this one happens in the daytime!”

(The story shifts back to daytime)

Tigger: “Night!”

(The story shifts back to night)

Piglet: “Day!”

(The story shifts back to day)

Tigger: “Night!”

(The story shifts back to night)

Piglet: “Day!”

(The story shifts back to day)

Tigger: “Morning!”

(The story shifts to morning)

Piglet: “Evening! ... Oh, dear...”

(The story goes back to night)

Tigger: “That’s better, hoo-hoo-hoo! Although a nice thunderstorm wouldn't hurt!”


Tigger: “Well if youre going to have a story about a scientist, he oughta at least be doin something terribibble! Like creatin a boogly, boogly monster!”

Piglet: “M-m-m-monster?”

Tigger: “Yeah! The Monster Frankenpooh!”

Piglet: “Oh... d-d-d-dear...”

Tigger: “Hoo-hoo-hoo! Absotutely perfect! ... Only, he oughta be a little bit bigger than that!”

(Frankenpooh grows bigger)

Tigger: “No, even bigger!”

(Frankenpooh grows even bigger)

Tigger: “BIGGERER!”

(Frankenpooh grows even bigger and hits his head on the ceiling)

Frankenpooh: “Oh bother..."

Tigger: “Now THAT’S what I call a monster! Hoo-hoo-hoo!”

Gopher: “M-m-m-m-monsterrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr!!!!” (Gopher falls a very long way down his hole)

Piglet: “Tigger, I’m afraid this has become a not-at-all-so-not-so-scary scary story! Perhaps I better tell it. Because I really think the monster shouldn’t be quite that size.”

(Frankenpooh shrinks back to his normal Winnie the Pooh size)

Tigger: “Oh, you’re right, Piglet! He oughta be maybe quadrooply as big!”

(Frankenpooh grows four times his monster size and hits the top of the film strip)

Frankenpooh: “Um, Tigger, I seem to have reached the top of the picture.”

Tigger: “So you have. Maybe I overshot it by a few feetsies.”

(Frankenpooh shrinks back down to his original monster size and stomps off)

Frankenpooh: “Thank you, Tigger.”


Trivia

  • Frankenstein

    The theatrical poster for 1931's Frankenstein starring Boris Karloff, to which this episode is based on.

    There is a fourth-wall break in the story, in which Pooh grows so tall he reaches the top of the picture, making Tigger have to shrink him.
  • Owl makes a cameo appearance in this episode during Piglet’s story.
  • This is the only episode in the series that is 5 minutes long.
  • In the story, Frankenpooh is only referred to as “Frankenpooh” once. The rest of the story he is referred to as “The Monster.”
  • This marks Gopher’s longest fall yet.

Video Releases

Gallery

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